Yungas – Road of Death

It begins at 15,400 feet and for an estimated 300 people a year ends in the loss of their life, yet Bolivia’s North Yungus Road – better known as ‘The Death Road’ – is among Bolivia’s largest draw cards for a thrill-seeking adventure. So after a late night in central La Paz, the journey to the Death Road began.

2016-10-09-06-15-552016-10-09-06-15-192016-10-09-05-59-33OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAdsc_0682

Travelers and tourists cycle the road in their masses, through the sweeping and never ending mountains of Bolivia. Prior to my departure, I managed to negotiate leaving 1 hour earlier than the standard departure time from La Paz. My thinking was that this way would provide a good chance of having the road completely free of dozens of other tour operators and the hordes of tourists on wheels. Thankfully, it worked out a dream – no other tourists were seen. Perfect.

2016-10-09-06-17-102016-10-09-06-13-532016-10-09-06-09-252016-10-09-06-02-022016-10-09-05-49-262016-10-09-05-47-26

“It’s been referred to as ‘Death Road’ pretty much since 1994 when Inter-American Development Bank proclaimed it was the World’s Most Dangerous Road. The organisation conducted a study and discovered 200 to 300 people were dying on the road per year.”

2016-10-09-05-52-092016-10-09-05-47-262016-10-09-05-43-252016-10-09-05-38-452016-10-09-05-35-522016-10-09-05-34-26For the locals, the ‘Death Road’ is an important transport route which they brave in cars and trucks, teetering on the edge and risking their lives with every trip.

2016-10-09-05-26-162016-10-09-05-25-502016-10-09-05-22-59dsc_0691dsc_0686

Bolivian natives are forced to use the road as a crucial transport route, with local road rules specifying that the downhill driver never has the right of way and must move to the outer edge of the road. Not a place to have road rage, or to ignore the highway code – that’s for sure.

2016-10-09-05-20-072016-10-09-05-14-222016-10-09-05-08-45

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s